Here’s an interview by James Smart for the List Magazine regarding my trip n up to Edinburgh:

n

Hello n Mark

n

Po Na Na is a very bar-like club – and you’ll be playing on a Thursday night. n Does that make it more of a challenge, and how will it affect your set?

n

I think it means I can play more diverse music – experiment more. Or at least n I hope so! Most clubs you go to nowadays just play one vibe all night on the n main dancefloor and you tend to find more interesting and unusual music in smaller n places.

n

Quite a few of your recent dates in Scotland have been at nights like Taste n and Aurall. Why do you keep coming back to them? Is the jaunt up North a fun n one?

n

I love coming to Scotland. The crowd are just more passionate than a London n crowd. That’s not to say London crowds aren’t appreciative, it’s just they are n more reserved in showing it.

n

The date is under the Smirnoff banner. Does all the commercialism that surrounds n dance music make it a less fun thing to be involved in?

n

You can never beat when a new movement is heading through uncharted territory, n away from the eyes of the masses. But that doesn’t negate what’s going on now. n Sure commercialism can get a bit overkill but I’ve seen underground clubs work n with sponsors in such a way that benefits just by allowing them to give a better n party to their party goers. Sponsorship is fine as long as you don’t go selling n your soul!

n

Theme from S Express is one of the classic house records. Did you think n it would take off like it did? And are you keen on the host of Old Skool nights/compilations n that are coming out?

n

I never analysed Theme From S’Express when I made it. It was something for n me and my friends that I could play at my club nights which didn’t initially n fit in with anything else at the time.

n

As for the Old Skool nights I must admit I am partial to digging out some of n those old tunes! There’s tons of old music I love to play, and I’m not just n talking from Acid House days, so any excuse and I’m there!

n

As for the compilations, a couple come out and it’s great, then everyone follows n fashion and it becomes cliche. Just look at it as education for the young ‘uns!

n

You’ve remixed and collaborated with a wide range of people. But did you n actually meet Prince and Malcolm MaLaren, and if so who was the more freaky?

n

Never actually met Prince although he would ring me up at home. He was going n through his bankruptcy thing at the time and sounded remarkably perky considering n what was going on.

n

Malcolm McClaren I’ve met a few times. When me and William Orbit were remixing n his tracks Malcolm would come down to participate but would end up telling stories n on everything from the Sex Pistols to life in Hollywood. He was such a master n storyteller that we never got much done when he was in the studio.

n

Neither of them seemed freaky to me!

n

Sonique sang on a lot of your early stuff. Was she interested in the DJing/production n side of things back then, and did you give her any tips?

n

She loved the whole dj/production thing. In the end I bought her decks and n a mixer and she locked herself away in her lab emerging triumphantly years later!

n

Your red phone’s been a fixture for some time. What’s wrong with headphones, n and are you tempted to get a mobile?

n

Can’t use normal headphones. They just feel so clumpy! It’s because I’ve been n using the telephone for ages. It’s like a sailor that’s been at sea for so long n who comes back to dry land and is unable to keep his balance.

n

I still haven’t got a mobile phone. I think those invisible waves are slowly n frying the minds of all humans. Have you noticed when a mobile rings and the n car system or your speakers go bonkers! Well that’s what I think it’s doing n to our brains!

n

The generation of DJs who started out in the mid/late 80s are still going n strong. What have you got that the kids haven’t?

n

We were spoilt! We had djs who played a variety of music in one night. There n was so much musical knowledge to soak up from different genres (as there is n now). We would willingly seek out clubs each night that played completely different n styles rather then sticking to one type of music. It was all about discovery n and all music was good! (Or so it seemed at the time) Even pop music was fantastic n not like the bland hell of today’s pop! A good record you could play every week n for years and not get bored of it. Records were less disposable then. Oh gawd n I’m starting to salivate!

n

Oh, and nice one for putting Scorpio by Grandmaster Flash in your Top Thirty. n I’ve never understood why it gets overlooked so often. Thanks for answering n the questions, and I hope things go well.

n

James Smart
n The List

n

check n out my MM01 mix compilation